Various jazz jamboree 66 vol 1 - 1,000 Jazz Albums You Should Hear Before You Die – The.


581.  Platinum Glenn Miller (compilation) – Glenn Miller (RCA, 2003 compilation release date, 1939-1942 recording dates)

A Did not chart on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart ( Billboard rules at the time prevented album cuts from charting). Chart peak listed represents the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Airplay chart.

Signature Theme 2 on various shows: My Twilight Dream [based upon Chopin's "Nocturne in Eb (, No. 2)"][aka: "Eddy Duchin Story" movie Theme: "To Love Again"]

Changing label designs present a challenge for discographers. If the records were actually issued in the order indicated by the catalog numbers, and the issue dates were far enough apart, it would be relatively straightforward to find when a label change took place. In large record companies (and even sometimes in smaller companies), the record catalog number was assigned to an album when the project (album) was approved by those in charge of such things. So, the catalog number sequence represents more the order of approval of the album than release of the album.

We have included the actual release dates as given in the Columbia Records files for many of the albums on this page. It is obvious that albums were not issued in strict numerical order. One needs to determine the date when the change took place, then compare the actual release dates for the albums. Generally, albums released after that date will have the new label, and those released before that date will have the old label. Of course, that assumes there actually is one specific date for the change, which may not be the case at all. In many record companies, pressing plants were instructed to use up the stock of old labels before using the new ones, and often "pre-change" albums would run out of labels before the press run was complete, using the new labels as part of the original press run. Often, the best a discographer can do is approximate the date for the change, and find and observe which labels are on original pressings of each album.

In late summer, 1954, Columbia announced it would be changing their logo from the old double-circle "musical notes and microphone" logo (shown, near right) to a new logo featuring a graphic designer's rendition of a television camera lens (far right). This was informally called the "CBS Eye" logo. The new logo was gradually incorporated into print advertising and on the record jackets, but did not appear on the record labels itself until 1955. The changeover was messy for discographers: not at all a clean break in the catalog sequence.

Doris Day's soundtrack album Love Me Or Leave Me, released in early June, 1955 on CL-710, may have chronologically been one of the first albums with the "six eye" label. Although we have seen dozens of copies, we have not yet found one with the old label. Most albums released July, 1955, or later have the new "six eye" label, but not all. Albums released as late as September, 1955, have been found with the old label (the highest catalog number we have found is Columbia CL-664). For the albums below that say, "Original label was the old Columbia label with the 'musical notes and microphone' logo," we have verified that they exist with the old label. For the releases before CL-664 that we have not indicated the old label verification, we have seen very few copies, so the jury is still out. Songs of the West by the Norman Luboff Choir [CL-657], was released in August, 1955, and definitely had the new label, since even the promotional copies had the new label.

Columbia's release schedule, as might be deduced from the above, was quite unpredictable. In June, 1955, when most of their releases were in the 600s, they had already released albums in the 700s and by September, even jumped to a few releases in the 800s!

Original pressings of albums on this page have the "deep groove" about a half-inch inside the label edge.


Albums issued in 1954 had the red and gold/silver label first used in the summer of 1953 (far left). In 1955, Columbia shifted label design to a red label with black and white print, with three stylized television cameras (or camera lenses) on each side of the label (near left). The label became informally known as the "six eye" label. Promotional labels for the first label design were white with black print (far left). Promo labels for the "six eye" label were white with red print (near left).

We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now is an information web page and is not connected in any way to Columbia Records or Sony Music. All of these records are out of print and we have none of these records for sale. If you are interested in obtaining copies of any of these, we'd suggest you follow the suggestions found on our "Frequently Asked Questions" page. This story and discography are copyright 1999, 2002, 2005, 2012, 2015 by Mike Callahan.

Ann Arbor - Dawn Dance : Weekend dance festival held in late February at the Ypsilanti Middle School, 105 N. Mansfield St., Ypsilanti MI. Includes Contras, English country, Couple dancing, Workshops and Late Night Party! Register in advance for a discount. Web site: http:///ddw/ .

In 1973, PBS broadcast and syndicated Rich's February 6, 1973, performance at the Top of the Plaza in Rochester, New York . It was the first time thousands of drummers were exposed to Buddy in a full-length concert setting, and many drummers continue to name this program as a prime influence on their own playing. [17] One of his most widely seen television performances was in a 1981 episode of The Muppet Show , in which he engaged Muppet drummer "Animal" (played by Ronnie Verrell ) in a drum battle. [18] Rich's famous televised drum battles also included Gene Krupa , Ed Shaughnessy and Louie Bellson . [18]

Columbia Main Series, Part 2 : CL 600-699 (1954-1955) By Mike Callahan, David Edwards, and Patrice Eyries Last update: October 15, …

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Various Jazz Jamboree 66 Vol 1Various Jazz Jamboree 66 Vol 1

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